Longwood Gardens – Winter lights and bright nights

Longwood Gardens Conservatory entrance
Longwood Gardens Conservatory entrance
The weather was unseasonably warm for Christmastime in Philadelphia. I unzipped the padded liner on my coat and joined the family for an outing to Longwood Gardens. We’d procrastinated and bought our tickets the day before – grabbing a few of the last.  The crush of crowds is kept to a minimum with numbers limited on the property at a time.
Longwood light reflections
What makes Longwood Gardens such a hot ticket for the holidays?
The lights!
Spread out over 1,077 acres, Pierre du Pont (Yes, of the famous Dupont family) built one of the greatest gardens in the world in the 1920’s. In winter it’s especially tantalizing with thousands of light displays spread across limbs and roots, across bridges and around fountains. But I think that the vast labyrinth of Conservatory buildings are the real treasure.
Tree decorated inside the Longwood Gardens conservatory
Boiler room of Longwood Lights worked to warm the Conservatories into the 1960's!

Boiler room of Longwood Gardens worked to warm the Conservatories into the 1960’s

A plaque on one Conservatory entrance reads:
“Longwood Gardens is the living legacy of Pierre S. du Pont, inspiring people through excellence in garden design, horticulture, education and the arts.”
I was unprepared for the impact that walking through the dark and acres of trails would have on me. The night was chilly for a Southern Californian but mercifully still. As we strolled, children and families chattered, giggled and strode by. Some brought flashlights but I was glad we didn’t; preferring to let my eyes adjust to the dark and splashes of illuminated color.
Longwood lights wrapped tree
Poinsettia display inside the Longwood Gardens conservatory.

Poinsettia display inside one of the Longwood Gardens conservatories.

At one point, four G-scale trains wound over a 17 foot steel bridge, past a 5-foot wide waterfall, and past miniature Longwood landmarks. The landmarks are built from natural materials – roof tiles are laid of magnolia leaves and there are handrails of honeysuckle vines.
Longwood lights miniature train building

Longwood lights miniature train building

Du Pont in Banana room

Du Pont in his Banana House

A Banana House for Philadelphia
Mr. du Pont had a passion for growing fruit indoors – including tropical crops. Just after the Conservatory was opened in 1921, the Banana House was one of many areas where he grew fruit for his employees, friends and family. In 1983 the space was reduced to expand the Orchid House. How times and priorities have changed. A plaque near the entrance is inscribed:
To Pierre Samuel DuPont and presented by the people of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for his ‘generous and unselfish service.”
Inside one Longwood Lights conservatory

Inside one Longwood Lights conservatory

The main house was closed that evening but we spent a few minutes listening to an organist as he brought the historical pipes to life. The space inside the Conservatory was warm and rows of chairs inviting. As the music lifted up to the lofty glass ceiling above us, our spirits rose in kind. It was a bittersweet moment – remembering the lyrics and mumbling along, remembering loved ones gone and missing, remembering childhood and how special this time of year was and remains. Misty eyed, hearts full of the spirit of the season, we left soon after to drive back to central Philadelphia.

Longwood Lights organist

If you go to Longwood Lights:
  • Miss the crowds at the ticket booth and purchase tickets online. (They do sell out!) Longwood Gardens Website.
  • Be prepared to walk and dress in layers.
  • Wear comfortable shoes and bring a little cash for hot chocolate or cider in the Gardens.
  • Read a pleasant exploration of Pierre du Pont and the Longwood estate history on The Short History Blog

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